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Data from: Resolving relationships and phylogeographic history of the Nyssa sylvatica complex using data from RAD-seq and species distribution modeling

Citation

Zhou, Wenbin et al. (2018), Data from: Resolving relationships and phylogeographic history of the Nyssa sylvatica complex using data from RAD-seq and species distribution modeling, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bb3h52t

Abstract

Nyssa sylvatica complex consists of several woody taxa occurring in eastern North America. These taxa were recognized as two or three species including three or four varieties by different authors. Due to high morphological similarities and complexity of morphological variation, classification and delineation of taxa in the group have been difficult and controversial. Here we employ data from RAD-seq to elucidate the genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships within the group. Using the genetic evidence, we evaluate previous classifications and delineate species. We also employ Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) to evaluate impacts of climatic changes on the ranges of the taxa and to gain insights into the relevant refugia in eastern North America. Results from Molecular Variance Analysis (AMOVA), STRUCTURE, phylogenetic analyses using Maximum likelihood, Bayesian Inference, and Splittree methods of RAD-seq data strongly support a two-clade pattern, largely separating samples of N. sylvatica from those of N. biflora-N. ursina mix. Divergence time analysis with BEAST suggests the two clades diverged in the mid Miocene. The ancestor of the present trees of N. sylvatica was suggested to be in the Pliocene and that of N. biflora-N. ursina mix in the end of the Miocene. Results from SDM predicted a smaller range in the southern part of the species present range of each clade during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). A northward expansion of the ranges during interglacial period and a northward shift of the ranges in the future under a model of global warming were also predicted. Our results support the recognition of two species in the complex, N. sylvatica and N. biflora, following the phylogenetic species concept. We found no genetic evidence supporting recognitions of intraspecific taxa. However, we propose subsp. ursina and subsp. biflora within N. biflora due to their distinction in habits, distributions, and habitats. Our results further support movements of trees in eastern North America in response to climatic changes. Finally, our study demonstrates that RAD-seq data and a combination of population genomics and SDM are valuable in resolving relationship and biogeographic history of closely related species that are taxonomically difficult.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1442161

Location

United States