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Data from: Finite-element analysis of microwave scattering from a three-dimensional human head model for brain stroke detection

Citation

Munawar Qureshi, Awais; Mustansar, Zartasha; Mustafa, Samah (2018), Data from: Finite-element analysis of microwave scattering from a three-dimensional human head model for brain stroke detection, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bh39282

Abstract

In this paper, a detailed analysis of microwave (MW) scattering from a three-dimensional (3D) anthropomorphic human head model is presented. It is the first time that the finite-element method (FEM) has been deployed to study the MW scattering phenomenon of a 3D realistic head model for brain stroke detection. A major contribution of this paper is to add anatomically more realistic details to the human head model compared with the literature available to date. Using the MRI database, a 3D numerical head model was developed and segmented into 21 different types through a novel tissue-mapping scheme and a mixed-model approach. The heterogeneous and frequency-dispersive dielectric properties were assigned to brain tissues using the same mapping technique. To mimic the simulation set-up, an eight-elements antenna array around the head model was designed using dipole antennae. Two types of brain stroke (haemorrhagic and ischaemic) at various locations inside the head model were then analysed for possible detection and classification. The transmitted and backscattered signals were calculated by finding out the solution of the Helmholtz wave equation in the frequency domain using the FEM. FE mesh convergence analysis for electric field values and comparison between different types of iterative solver were also performed to obtain error-free results in minimal computational time. At the end, specific absorption rate analysis was conducted to examine the ionization effects of MW signals to a 3D human head model. Through computer simulations, it is foreseen that MW imaging may efficiently be exploited to locate and differentiate two types of brain stroke by detecting abnormal tissues’ dielectric properties. A significant contrast between electric field values of the normal and stroke-affected brain tissues was observed at the stroke location. This is a step towards generating MW scattering information for the development of an efficient image reconstruction algorithm.

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