Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Slow and temperature-mediated pathogen adaptation to a non-specific fungicide in agricultural ecosystem

Citation

He, Meng-Han et al. (2017), Data from: Slow and temperature-mediated pathogen adaptation to a non-specific fungicide in agricultural ecosystem, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bp81r

Abstract

The spread of antimicrobial resistance and global change in air temperature represent two major phenomena that are exerting a disastrous impact on natural and social issues but investigation of the interaction between these phenomena in an evolutionary context is limited. In this study, a statistical genetic approach was used to investigate the evolution of antimicrobial resistance in agricultural ecosystem and its association with local air temperature. We found no resistance to mancozeb, a non-specific fungicide widely used in agriculture for more than half a century, in 215 Alternaria alternata isolates sampled from geographic locations along a climatic gradient and cropping system representing diverse ecotypes in China, consistent with low resistance risk in many non-specific fungicides. Genetic variance accounts for ~35% of phenotypic variation while genotype-environment interaction is negligible, suggesting that heritability plays a more important role in the evolution of resistance to mancozeb in plant pathogens than phenotypic plasticity. We also found that tolerance to mancozeb in agricultural ecosystem is under constraining selection and significantly associated with local air temperature, possibly resulting from a pleiotropic effect of tolerance with thermal and other ecological adaptations. The implication of these results for fungicide and other antimicrobial management in the context of global warming is discussed.

Usage Notes