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Dryad

North Campus Open Space (NCOS) Monthly Bird Survey Data (2017-2023)

Cite this dataset

Rickard, Alison (2024). North Campus Open Space (NCOS) Monthly Bird Survey Data (2017-2023) [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bvq83bkhz

Abstract

Bird surveys are completed once a month by Cheadle Center staff and associates. Each survey starts 45 minutes after sunrise and lasts about 2 hours. The survey has at least 4 experienced birders- 2 that survey the eastern side and 2 that survey the western route (exact routes can be found on ArcGIS online). Surveyors use a combination of binoculars, scopes, and listening for calls to identify species. A point is placed on the map to the best accuracy possible using the ArcGIS app field maps or collector. The survey is also set up to record the surveyors' location every 30 seconds as a way to track the survey route. When there are large groups of birds, 10 or more, an approximate number is decided between the two surveyors. If a bird is seen multiple times along the route, it is labeled a repeat. The two groups met up after the survey and discussed what was seen. Any birds that are expected to be a repeat were changed to note that they were a repeat within the dataset. Environmental data such as cloud cover, water level, and temperature are recorded at the beginning and end of the survey.

This data is an aggregation that contains the number of each species spotted on site each month. If you are interested in the birds' exact location, you can download individual monthly data from ArcGIS Online.

README: North Campus Open Space (NCOS) Monthly Bird Survey Data (2017-2023)

https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bvq83bkhz

A thorough data description can be found at https://escholarship.org/uc/ccber_data_descriptions

Description of the data and file structure

The data consists of only one .csv file. The following describes each column of data

  1. Observation.Date: Date at which the survey was completed.
  2. Year: Calendar year that the survey was completed.
  3. Species: Species identification common name
  4. General.Type:  Classification of bird type including the following types: 'Comorants', 'Gulls & Terns', 'Herons, Egrets, Ibis', 'Hummingbirds', 'Insectivores- Aerial', 'Insectivores- Terrestrial', 'Kingfisher', 'Omnivores', 'Seed & Fruit Eaters', 'Shorebirds', 'Wardblers', 'Waterfowl & Friends'
  5. eBird.Group: More detailed classification of bird types including the following types: 'Blackbirds', 'Cardinals, Grosbeaks, and Allies', 'Catbirds, Mockingbirds, and Thrashers', 'Cormorants and Anhingas', 'Estrildids', 'Falcons and Caracaras', 'Finches, Euphonias, and Allies', 'Gnatcatchers', 'Grebes', 'Grouse, Quail, and Allies', 'Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers', 'Herons, Ibis, and Allies', 'Hummingbirds', 'Jays, Magpies, Crows, and Ravens', 'Kingfishers', 'Kinglets', 'Martins and Swallows', 'New World Sparrows', 'Nuthatches', 'Old World Sparrows', 'Owls', 'Parrotbills, Wrentit, and Allies', 'Penduline-Tits and Long-tailed Tits', 'Pigeons and Daves', 'Rails, Gallinules, and Allies', 'Shorebirds', 'Shrikes', 'Thrushes', 'Tits, Chickadees, and Titmice', 'Tyrant Flycatchers: Pewees, Kingbirds, and Allies', 'Vultures, Hawks, and Allies', 'Wagtails and Pipits', 'Waterfowl', 'Woodpeckers', 'Wood-Warblers', 'Wrens'
  6. Count: Number of the specified species seen on that survey.
  7. Substrate: Material or environment that the birds are spotted.
  8. Repeat.Observation: wether this bird has already been accounted for in a different part of the survey.
  9. Sex: Male or Female recorded if noticable.
  10. Breeding.Activity: Noted if observed.
  11. Slough.Water.Elevation.ft.: Water elevation onserved at the begining of the survey at Venoco bridge

Sharing/Access information

Georeferenced location can be found at ArcGIS online public repository and is downloaded separately for each month’s survey. Individual surveys are searchable using location_bird_survey_data_YYYYMMDD (ex. NCOS_bird_survey_data_20190826) OR location_bird_observation_YYYYMMDD (ex. CL_bird_observation_20200113). The survey route is also available on arcgis online searchable by using location_bird_survey_route_YYYYMMDD

Links to other publicly accessible locations of the data:

Methods

Each survey starts 45 minutes after sunrise, and lasts about 2 hours. The survey has at least 4 experienced birders- 2 that survey the eastern side and 2 that survey the western route (exact routes can be found on ArcGIS online). Surveyors use a combination of binoculars, scopes and listening for calls to identify species. A point is placed on the map to the best accuracy possible using the ArcGIS app field maps or collector. The survey is also set up to record the surveyors location every 30 seconds as a way to track the survey route. When there are large groups of birds 10 or more an approximate number is decided between the two surveyors. If a bird is seen multiple times along the route it is labeled as a repeat.