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Data from: Testing models of refugial isolation, colonization and population connectivity in two species of montane salamanders

Citation

Rovito, Sean M.; Schoville, Sean D. (2017), Data from: Testing models of refugial isolation, colonization and population connectivity in two species of montane salamanders, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.c197n

Abstract

Pleistocene glaciations have profoundly affected patterns of genetic diversity within many species. Temperate alpine organisms likely experienced dramatic range shifts, given that much of their habitat was glaciated during this time. While the effects of glaciations are relatively well understood, the spatial locations of refugia and processes that gave rise to current patterns of diversity are less well known. We use a microsatellite data set to test hypotheses of population connectivity and refugial isolation in the web-toed salamanders (Hydromantes) of the Sierra Nevada. We reject models of refugia with subsequent expansion into either the high southern Sierra or low-elevation Owens Valley, in favor of a simple isolation model with no migration between current populations. We find no evidence of migration at even moderate spatial scales using a variety of analyses in the southern Sierra, and limited migration in the northern Sierra. These results suggest that divergence in isolation following fragmentation is the dominant process structuring genetic variation in these salamander species. In the context of anthropogenic climate change and habitat degradation, these results imply that salamanders and other low-vagility alpine organisms are at risk of decline as they are unlikely to migrate across large distances.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1026396, OISE-0965038

Location

USA
Sierra Nevada
California