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Data from: Weak olfaction increases seed scatter-hoarding by Siberian chipmunks: implication in shaping plant-animal interactions

Citation

Yi, Xianfeng; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Hongmao; Zhang, Zhibin (2016), Data from: Weak olfaction increases seed scatter-hoarding by Siberian chipmunks: implication in shaping plant-animal interactions, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.c1d09

Abstract

Scatter-hoarding of seeds by animals plays an essential role in seed dispersal of plants and in shaping plant–animal interactions in forest ecosystems, but the function of scatter-hoarding behavior is still unclear. We hypothesize that weak olfactory cues between seeds and scatter-hoarding animals would increase scatter-hoarding. Using a rodent–plant system of Siberian chipmunks Tamias sibiricus and Korean pines Pinus koraiensis, we tested the effects on seed scatter-hoarding intensity by measuring and modifying the seed odor intensities and the abilities of the animals to detect seed odor. Siberian chipmunks seemed to scatter-hoard more seeds with weaker odor signals, and Siberian chipmunks with reduced olfactory ability scatter-hoarded more seeds, supporting our hypothesis. Our studies suggest that olfaction may have played an important role in the evolution of the strength of seed odor and scatter-hoarding behavior of animals, and in shaping plant–animal interactions.

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