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Data from: Genomic signatures of sympatric speciation with historical and contemporary gene flow in a tropical anthozoan (Hexacorallia: Actiniaria)

Citation

Titus, Benjamin M.; Blischak, Paul D.; Daly, Marymega (2019), Data from: Genomic signatures of sympatric speciation with historical and contemporary gene flow in a tropical anthozoan (Hexacorallia: Actiniaria), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.c6f51c0

Abstract

Sympatric diversification is increasingly thought to have played an important role in the evolution of biodiversity around the globe. However, an in situ sympatric origin for co-distributed taxa is difficult to demonstrate empirically because different evolutionary processes can lead to similar biogeographic outcomes- especially in ecosystems that can readily facilitate secondary contact due to a lack of hard barriers to dispersal. Here we use a genomic (ddRADseq), model-based approach to delimit a species complex of tropical sea anemones that are co-distributed on coral reefs throughout the Tropical Western Atlantic. We use coalescent simulations in fastsimcoal2 to test competing diversification scenarios that span the allopatric-sympatric continuum. We recover support that the corkscrew sea anemone Bartholomea annulata (Le Sueur, 1817) is a cryptic species complex, co-distributed throughout its range. Simulation and model selection analyses suggest these lineages arose in the face of historical and contemporary gene flow, supporting a sympatric origin, but an alternative secondary contact model also receives appreciable model support. Leveraging the genome of Exaiptasia diaphana we identify five loci under divergent selection between cryptic B. annulata lineages that fall within mRNA transcripts or CDS regions. Our study provides a rare empirical, genomic example of sympatric speciation in a tropical anthozoan. Finally, these data represent the first range-wide molecular study of any tropical sea anemone, underscoring that anemone diversity is under described in the tropics, and highlighting the need for additional systematic studies into these ecologically and economically important species.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1601645; DEB-1257796

Location

Tropical Western Atlantic