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Data from: Availability of food resources and habitat structure shape the individual‐resource network of a neotropical marsupial

Citation

de Camargo, Nicholas F. et al. (2019), Data from: Availability of food resources and habitat structure shape the individual‐resource network of a neotropical marsupial, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.c73p54m

Abstract

1. Spatial and temporal variation in networks has been reported in different studies. However, the many effects of habitat structure and food-resource availability variation on network structures have remained poorly investigated, especially in individual-based networks. This approach can shed light on individual specialization of resource use and how habitat variations shape trophic interactions. 2. To test hypotheses related to habitat variability on trophic interactions, we investigated seasonal and spatial variation in network structure of four populations of the marsupial Gracilinanus agilis in the highly seasonal tropical savannas of the Brazilian Cerrado. 3. We evaluated such variation with network nestedness and modularity considering both cool-dry and warm-wet seasons, and related such variations with food resource availability and habitat structure (considered in the present study as environmental variation) in four sites of savanna woodland forest. 4. Network analyses showed that modularity (but not nestedness) was consistently lower during the cool-dry season in all G. agilis populations. Our results indicated that nestedness is related to habitat structure, showing that this metric increases in sites with thick and spaced trees. On the other hand, modularity was positively related to diversity of arthropods and abundance of fruits. 5. We propose that the relationship between nestedness and habitat structure is an outcome of individual variation in the vertical space and food resource use by G. agilis in sites with thick and spaced trees. Moreover, individual specialization in resource-rich and population-dense periods possibly increased the network modularity of G. agilis. Therefore, our study reveals that environment variability considering spatial and temporal components is important for shaping network structure of populations.

Usage Notes

Location

Central Brazil