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Data from: Extreme diel dissolved oxygen and carbon cycles in shallow vegetated lakes

Citation

Andersen, Mikkel R.; Kragh, Theis; Sand-Jensen, Kaj (2017), Data from: Extreme diel dissolved oxygen and carbon cycles in shallow vegetated lakes, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.c95fk

Abstract

A common perception in limnology is that shallow lakes are homogeneously mixed owing to their small water volume. However, this perception is largely gained by downscaling knowledge from large lakes to their smaller counterparts. Here we show that shallow vegetated lakes (< 0.6 m), in fact, undergo recurring daytime stratification and nocturnal mixing accompanied by extreme chemical variations during summer. Dense submerged vegetation effectively attenuates light and turbulence generating separation between warm surface waters and much colder bottom waters. Photosynthesis in surface waters produces oxygen accumulation and CO2 depletion, whereas respiration in dark bottom waters causes anoxia and CO2 accumulation. High daytime pH in surface waters promotes precipitation of CaCO3 which is re-dissolved in bottom waters. Nocturnal convective mixing re-introduces oxygen into bottom waters for aerobic respiration and regenerated inorganic carbon into surface waters, which supports intense photosynthesis. Our results reconfigure the basic understanding of local environmental gradients in shallow lakes, one of the most abundant freshwater habitats globally.

Usage Notes

Location

Northern Europe