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Data from: Selection for population specific adaptation has shaped patterns of variation in the photoperiod pathway genes in Arabidopsis lyrata during post glacial colonization

Citation

Mattila, Tiina M. et al. (2015), Data from: Selection for population specific adaptation has shaped patterns of variation in the photoperiod pathway genes in Arabidopsis lyrata during post glacial colonization, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.cc568

Abstract

Spatially varying selection can lead to population-specific adaptation, which is often recognized at the phenotypic level; however, the genetic evidence is weaker in many groups of organisms. In plants, environmental shifts that occur due to colonization of a novel environment may require adaptive changes in the timing of growth and flowering, which are often governed by location-specific environmental cues such as day length. We studied locally varying selection in 19 flowering time loci in nine populations of the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata, which has a wide but patchy distribution in temperate and boreal regions of the northern hemisphere. The populations differ in their recent population demographic and colonization histories and current environmental conditions, especially in the growing season length. We searched for population-specific molecular signatures of directional selection by comparing a set of candidate flowering time loci with a genomic reference set within each population using multiple approaches and contrasted the patterns of different populations. The candidate loci possessed approximately 20 % of the diversity of the reference loci. On average the flowering time loci had more rare alleles (a smaller Tajima’s D) and an excess of highly differentiated sites relative to the reference, suggesting positive selection. The strongest signal of selection was detected in photoperiodic pathway loci in the colonizing populations of Northwestern Europe, whereas no evidence of positive selection was detected in the Central European populations. These findings emphasized the population-specific nature of selection and suggested that photoperiodic adaptation was important during post-glacial colonization of the species.

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