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Data from: Genetic and maternal effects on tail spine and body length in the invasive spiny water flea (Bythotrephes longimanus)

Citation

Miehls, Andrea L. J.; Peacor, Scott D.; McAdam, Andrew G. (2011), Data from: Genetic and maternal effects on tail spine and body length in the invasive spiny water flea (Bythotrephes longimanus), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.cd7467n6

Abstract

Interest in the evolution of invasive species has grown in recent years, yet few studies have investigated sources of variation in invasive species traits experiencing natural selection. The spiny water flea, Bythotrephes longimanus, is an invasive zooplankton in the Great Lakes that exhibits seasonal changes in tail spine and body length consistent with natural selection. Evolution of Bythotrephes traits, however, depends on the presence and magnitude of quantitative genetic variation, which could change within or across years. Clonal analysis of wild-captured Bythotrephes indicated that variance components for distal spine length were variable among but not within years. Spine length was always heritable but was not always influenced by maternal effects. In contrast, variance components for body length varied both within and among years, but likewise body length was always heritable and not always influenced by maternal effects. Results indicate that important Bythotrephes traits have heritable variation comparable to native species and other invasive species that would enable an evolutionary response to natural selection. This evolutionary capacity could contribute to the widespread success and dramatic effects of Bythotrephes invasion in systems with diverse biotic and abiotic conditions.

Usage Notes

Location

Lake Michigan