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Data from: Ontogenetic changes in embryonic and brain gene expression in progeny produced from migratory and resident Oncorhynchus mykiss

Citation

McKinney, Garrett J. et al. (2015), Data from: Ontogenetic changes in embryonic and brain gene expression in progeny produced from migratory and resident Oncorhynchus mykiss, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ch264

Abstract

Little information has been gathered regarding the ontogenetic changes that contribute to differentiation between resident and migrant individuals, particularly before the onset of gross morphological and physiological changes in migratory individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate gene expression during early development in Oncorhynchus mykiss populations with different life histories, in a tissue known to integrate environmental cues to regulate complex developmental processes and behaviours. We sampled offspring produced from migrant and resident parents, collecting whole embryos prior to the beginning of first feeding, and brain tissue at three additional time points over the first year of development. RNA sequencing for 32 individuals generated a reference transcriptome of 30 177 genes that passed count thresholds. Differential gene expression between migrant and resident offspring was observed for 1982 genes. The greatest number of differentially expressed genes occurred at 8 months of age, in the spring a full year before the obvious physiological transformation from stream-dwelling parr to sea water-adaptable smolts begins for migrant individuals. Sex and age exhibited considerable effects on differential gene expression between migrants and resident offspring. Differential gene expression was observed in genes previously associated with migration, but also in genes previously unassociated with early life history divergence. Pathway analysis revealed coordinated differential expression in genes related to phototransduction, which could modulate photoperiod responsiveness and variation in circadian rhythms. The role for early differentiation in light sensitivity and biological rhythms is particularly intriguing in understanding early brain processes involved in differentiation of migratory and resident life history types.

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