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Data from: Ecological specialization, variability in activity patterns, and response to environmental change

Citation

Hammond, Talisin T.; Palme, Rupert; Lacey, Eileen A. (2018), Data from: Ecological specialization, variability in activity patterns, and response to environmental change, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ch3k2s1

Abstract

Differences in temporal patterns of activity can modulate the ambient conditions to which organisms are exposed, providing an important mechanism for responding to environmental change. Such differences may be particularly relevant to ecological generalists, which are expected to encounter a wider range of environmental conditions. Here, we compare temporal patterns of activity for partially sympatric populations of a generalist (the lodgepole chipmunk, Tamias speciosus) and a more specialized congener (the alpine chipmunk, T. alpinus) that have displayed divergent responses to the past century of environmental change. Although mean activity budgets were similar between species, analyses of individual-level variation in locomotion revealed that T. alpinus exhibited a narrower range of activity patterns than T. speciosus. Further analyses revealed that T. alpinus was more active earlier in the day, when temperatures were cooler, and that activity patterns for both species changed with increased interspecific co-occurrence. These results are consistent with the greater responsiveness of T. alpinus to changes in environmental conditions. In addition to highlighting the utility of accelerometers for collecting behavioral data, our findings add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that the greater phenotypic variability displayed by ecological generalists may be critical to in situ responses to environmental change.

Usage Notes

Location

United States
Yosemite
California
Sierra Nevada Mountains
Yosemite National Park