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Evaluation of the silkworm lemon mutant as an invertebrate animal model for human sepiapterin reductase deficiency

Citation

Dai, Fangyin et al. (2020), Evaluation of the silkworm lemon mutant as an invertebrate animal model for human sepiapterin reductase deficiency, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.cjsxksn2n

Abstract

Human sepiapterin reductase deficiency is an inherited disease caused by SPR gene mutations and is a monoamine neurotransmitter disorder. Here, we investigated whether the silkworm lemon mutant could serve as a model of sepiapterin reductase deficiency. A point mutation in the BmSPR gene led to a five amino acid deletion at the carboxyl terminus in the lemon mutant. In addition, classical phenotypes seen in sepiapterin reductase deficient patients were observed in the lemon mutant, including a normal phenylalanine level, a decreased dopamine and serotonin content, and an increased neopterin level. A recovery test showed that replenishment of L-dopa significantly increased the dopamine level in the lemon mutant. The silkworm lemon mutant also showed negative behavioral abilities. These results suggest that the silkworm lemon mutant has an appropriate genetic basis and meets the biochemical requirements to be a model of sepiapterin reductase deficiency. Thus, the silkworm lemon mutant can serve as a candidate animal model of sepiapterin reductase deficiency, which may be helpful in facilitating accurate diagnosis and effective treatment options of sepiapterin reductase deficiency.

Methods

These gene sequences were collected from NCBI.

Funding

the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: Grant No. 31830094

the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities in China, Award: No. XDJK2019C014

Project funded by Chongqing Special Postdoctoral Science Foundation, Award: Grant No. XmT2018058

Funds of China Agriculture Research System, Award: No. CARS-18-ZJ0102

the Hi-Tech Research and Development 863 Program of China Grant, Award: Grant No. 2013AA102507