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Data from: Temporal population genetic structure in the pollen pool for flowering time: a field experiment with Brassica rapa (Brassicaceae)

Citation

Ison, Jennifer L.; Weis, Arthur E. (2018), Data from: Temporal population genetic structure in the pollen pool for flowering time: a field experiment with Brassica rapa (Brassicaceae), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.cn1c3

Abstract

Premise of the study: Assortative mating by flowering time can cause temporal genetic structure in species with heritable flowering times. A strong temporal structure, when coupled with a seasonal shift in selection, may lead to adaptive temporal clines. We implemented a prospective and retrospective method to estimate the temporal genetic structure in the pollen pool of Brassica rapa. Methods: The prospective method uses flowering schedules to estimate the seasonal shift in the pollen donors’ phenotype. By examining the offspring generation, we can get a direct estimate of temporal genetic structure, i.e., a retrospective estimate. However, this estimate is problematic because of the phenotypic correlation of the trait of interest, flowering time, between dam and sire. We developed a novel retrospective method that isolates flowering time by holding the maternal contribution constant and sampled the pollen pool in eight open-pollinated field plots throughout the flowering season. Key results: We found temporal genetic structure for flowering time in seven of the eight field plots. Interestingly, the direct (retrospective) temporal structure estimate was 35% larger than the prospective estimate based on flowering schedules. Spatial clumping of pollen donors did not affect temporal structure, but structure intensified when heritability was experimentally enhanced. Conclusions: Temporal genetic structure, especially for flowering time, likely occurs in many plant populations and may be underestimated using a prospective method. We discuss the genome-wide consequences of temporal genetic structure and the potential for adaptive temporal clines in plant populations.

Usage Notes

Location

Koffler Scientific Reserve- University of Toronto
44°1’ N 079°32’ W