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Data from: Adaptive evolution to novel predators facilitates the evolution of damselfly species range shifts

Citation

Siepielski, Adam M.; Beaulieu, Jeremy M. (2017), Data from: Adaptive evolution to novel predators facilitates the evolution of damselfly species range shifts, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.cr6tg

Abstract

Most species have evolved adaptations to reduce the chances of predation. In many cases adaptations to coexist with one predator generate tradeoffs in the ability to live with other predators. Consequently, the ability to live with one predator may limit the geographic distributions of species, such that adaptive evolution to coexist with novel predators may facilitate range shifts. In a case study with Enallagma damselflies, we used a comparative phylogenetic approach to test the hypothesis that adaptive evolution to live with a novel predator facilitates range size shifts. Our results suggest that the evolution of Enallagma shifting from living in ancestral lakes with fish as top predators, to living in lakes with dragonflies as predators, may have facilitated an increase in their range sizes. This increased range size likely arose because lakes with dragonflies were widespread, but unavailable as a habitat throughout much of the evolutionary history of Enallagma because they were historically maladapted to coexist with dragonfly predators. Additionally, the traits that have evolved as defenses against dragonflies also likely enhanced damselfly dispersal abilities. While many factors underlie the evolutionary history of species ranges, these results suggest a role for the evolution of predator-prey interactions.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB1620046

Location

North America