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Data from: New insights from bone microanatomy of the Late Triassic Hyperodapedon (Archosauromorpha, Rhynchosauria): implications for archosauromorph growth strategy

Citation

Mukherjee, Debarati (2015), Data from: New insights from bone microanatomy of the Late Triassic Hyperodapedon (Archosauromorpha, Rhynchosauria): implications for archosauromorph growth strategy, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.d0p8h

Abstract

Bone microanatomy of multiple postcranial skeletal elements of several individuals of Hyperodapedon collected from India is reported. This reveals that fibrolamellar bone tissue is predominant in the mid- and inner cortices, whereas the peripheral region of the cortex is composed of either parallel-fibred and/or lamellar bone. The pattern of primary osteons mostly ranges between laminar and subplexiform. Such predominance of fibrolamellar bone tissue in the cortex suggests an overall fast growth, which slowed down considerably later in ontogeny. Four distinct ontogenetic stages are identified based on the bone microstructure. During the juvenile stage, growth was fast and continuous, but it became punctuated during the early and late sub-adult stages. In adult individuals, growth was slow and showed periodic interruption but did not stop completely, suggesting that Hyperodapedon had an indeterminate growth strategy. Interelemental histovariations affecting cortical thickness, organization of the vascular network, incidence of growth rings and extent of secondary reconstruction are noted. Throughout ontogeny, the femora show higher cortical thickness than humeri and tibiae, suggesting differential appositional growth rate between the skeletal elements. Differences in cortical thickness are noted in the ribs, which suggest differential functional constraints based on anatomical site-specific occurrences. Although fibrolamellar bone tissue became progressively more dominant towards the archosaurs, there are considerable variations in the growth patterns of the archosauromorphs. This is exemplified by the bone microstructure of Hyperodapedon, which deviates from the generalized slow-growth pattern proposed for all basal archosauromorphs, suggesting that rapid growth was already present in the archosauromorphs. The cortical thickness of various long bones of Hyperodapedon bears similarity with that of several extant terrestrial quadrupeds, suggesting that Hyperodapedon was essentially a terrestrial quadruped.

Usage Notes

Location

India