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Data from: Female preference functions drive interpopulation divergence in male signalling: call diversity in the bushcricket Ephippiger diurnus

Citation

Barbosa, Flavia; Rebar, Darren; Greenfield, Michael D. (2016), Data from: Female preference functions drive interpopulation divergence in male signalling: call diversity in the bushcricket Ephippiger diurnus, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.d6446

Abstract

Female preferences play a major role in the elaboration and diversification of male traits: as a selective pressure on males, variation in female preferences can generate population divergence and ultimately, speciation. We studied how interpopulation differences in the shape of female mate preference functions may have shaped male advertisement signals in the bushcricket Ephippiger diurnus. This species is distributed as geographically isolated populations with striking interpopulation variation in male acoustic signals, most notably in the number of syllables per call. Here, we asked whether differences in the shape of preference functions exist among populations and whether those differences may have driven male signal evolution resulting in the observed differences in syllable numbers. Our results reveal fundamental differences in female preferences among populations, with differences in the overall preference function shape corresponding to differences in male signals. These differences in female preferences best explain the major differences in male signals among populations. The interpopulation variation in signals and preferences potentially reflects the evolutionary history of the species and may contribute to further divergence among populations and subsequent speciation.

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