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Data from: Hybridization alters early life-history traits and increases plant colonization success in a novel region

Citation

Hovick, Stephen M.; Campbell, Lesley G.; Snow, Allison A.; Whitney, Kenneth D. (2011), Data from: Hybridization alters early life-history traits and increases plant colonization success in a novel region, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.d8mq37r7

Abstract

Hybridization is hypothesized to promote invasiveness, but empirical tests comparing the performance of hybrid versus parental taxa in novel regions are lacking. We experimentally compared colonization ability of populations of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) versus populations of advanced-generation hybrids between wild and cultivated radish (R. sativus) in a southeast Texas pasture, well beyond the known invasive range of hybrid radish. We also manipulated the strength of interspecific competition to better generalize across variable environments. In both competitive environments, hybrid populations produced at least three times more seeds than wild radish populations, a distinction that was driven by greater hybrid seedling emergence, earlier hybrid emergence and more hybrid seedlings surviving to flower, rather than by greater individual fecundity. Flowering duration in hybrids was less negatively affected by competition than it was in wild radishes, while early emergence was associated with subsequent high seed output in both biotypes. Our data show that hybridization can enhance colonization success in a novel region, and, by comparison with previous studies, that the life-history traits enhancing hybrid success can differ across regions, even for lineages originating from the same hybridization event. These results imply a much larger arena for hybrid success than previously appreciated.

Usage Notes

Location

Southeast Texas