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Looks can be deceiving: speciation dynamics of co-distributed Angophora (Myrtaceae) species in a varying landscape

Citation

Rutherford, Susan et al. (2020), Looks can be deceiving: speciation dynamics of co-distributed Angophora (Myrtaceae) species in a varying landscape, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.dfn2z3507

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms underlying species divergence remains a central goal in evolutionary biology. Landscape genetics can be a powerful tool for examining evolutionary processes. We used genome-wide scans to genotype samples from populations of eight Angophora species. Angophora is a small genus within the eucalypts comprising common and rare species in a heterogeneous landscape, making it an appropriate group to study speciation. We found A. hispida was highly differentiated from the other species. Two subspecies of A. costata (subsp. costata and subsp. euryphylla) formed a group, while the third (subsp. leiocarpa, which is only distinguished by its smooth fruits and provenance) was supported as a distinct pseudocryptic species. Other species that are morphologically distinct could not be genetically differentiated (e.g., A. floribunda and A. subvelutina). Distribution and genetic differentiation within Angophora were strongly influenced by temperature and humidity, as well as biogeographic barriers, particularly rivers and higher elevation regions. While extensive introgression was found between many populations of some species (e.g., A. bakeri and A. floribunda), others only hybridized at certain locations. Overall, our findings suggest multiple mechanisms drove evolutionary diversification in Angophora and highlight how genome-wide analyses of related species in a diverse landscape can provide insights into speciation.