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Data from: Longer days, larger grays: Carryover effects of photoperiod and temperature in gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor

Cite this dataset

Neptune, Troy; Benard, Michael (2024). Data from: Longer days, larger grays: Carryover effects of photoperiod and temperature in gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.dfn2z358j

Abstract

Environmental conditions like temperature and photoperiod can strongly shape organisms’ growth and development. For many ectotherms with complex life cycles, global change will cause their offspring to experience warmer conditions and earlier-season photoperiods, two variables that can induce conflicting responses. We experimentally manipulated photoperiod and temperature during gray treefrog (Hyla versicolor) larval development to examine effects at metamorphosis and during short (10-day) and long (56-day) periods post-metamorphosis. Both early- and late-season photoperiods (April and August) decreased age and size at metamorphosis relative to the average-season (June) photoperiod, while warmer temperatures decreased age but increased size at metamorphosis. Warmer larval temperatures reduced short-term juvenile growth but had no long-term effect. Conversely, photoperiod had no short-term carryover effect, but juveniles from early- and late-season larval photoperiods had lower long-term growth rates than juveniles from the average-season photoperiod. Similar responses to early- and late-season photoperiods may be due to reduced total daylight compared to average-season photoperiods. However, juveniles from late-season photoperiods selected cooler temperatures than early-season juveniles, suggesting not all effects of photoperiod were due to total light exposure. Our results indicate that despite both temperature and photoperiod affecting metamorphosis, the long-term effects of photoperiod may be much stronger than those of temperature.

README: Data from: Longer days, larger grays: carryover effects of photoperiod and temperature in gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor


These data were derived from an outdoor mesocosm experiment manipulating photoperiod for 35 days. All mesocosms contained plankton communities from a local pond. All mesocosms contained 25 gray tree frog larvae (Hyla versicolor). Treefrogs were collected as they metamorphosed and reared in a laboratory for an additional 10 days, with a smaller subsample reared for an additional 56 days.

Description of the data and file structure

The amphibian datasets provide information on timing of and size at metamorphosis, growth, internal and external morphology, behavior, and food consumption. The plankton datasets contain phytoplankton fluorescence measures using a fluorometer, as a a relative measure of abundance, and zooplankton abundance counts from 1 mL water subsamples, along with a measure of diversity. We also include datasets on mesocosm temperature and light data.

Code/Software

We conducted all analyses in RStudio Build 554 using R version 4.2.1 (R Core Team, 2022). All data manipulation and visualization were conducted in the tidyverse package (Wickham et al., 2019).

Funding

Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biology Oglebay Fund