Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Variable competitive effects of fungicide resistance in field experiments with a plant pathogenic fungus

Citation

Hagerty, Christina H.; Graebner, Ryan C.; Sackett, Kathryn E.; Mundt, Christopher C. (2017), Data from: Variable competitive effects of fungicide resistance in field experiments with a plant pathogenic fungus, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.dk4n0

Abstract

Classic evolutionary theory suggests that mutations associated with antimicrobial and pesticide resistance result in a fitness cost in the absence of the selective antimicrobial agent or pesticide. There is experimental evidence to support fitness costs associated with resistance to anti-microbial compounds and pesticides across many biological disciplines, including human pathology, entomology, plant sciences, and plant pathology. However, researchers have also found examples of neutral and increased fitness associated with resistance, where the effect of a given resistance mutation depends on environmental and biological factors. We used Zymoseptoria tritici, a model evolutionary plant pathogenic fungus, to compare the competitive ability of fungicide-resistant isolates to fungicide-sensitive isolates. We conducted four large-scale inoculated winter wheat experiments at Oregon State University agriculture experiment stations. We found a significant change in the frequency of fungicide resistance over time in all four experiments. The direction and magnitude of these changes, however, differed by experimental location, year of experiment, and inoculum resistance treatment (fungicide-resistant, resistant/sensitive mixture, and fungicide-sensitive). These results suggest that the competitive ability of resistant isolates relative to sensitive isolates varied depending upon environmental conditions, including the initial frequency of resistant individuals in the population.

Usage Notes