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Data from: The impact of elevated temperature and drought on the ecology and evolution of plant-soil microbe interactions

Citation

Rasmussen, Pil U.; Bennett, Alison E.; Tack, Ayco J. M. (2019), Data from: The impact of elevated temperature and drought on the ecology and evolution of plant-soil microbe interactions, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.dt7bh4b

Abstract

1. Climate change is shifting the distribution of species, and may have a profound impact on the ecology and evolution of species interactions. However, we know little about the impact of increasing temperature and changing rainfall patterns on the interactions between plants and their beneficial and antagonistic root symbionts.

2. Here, we used a reciprocal multifactorial growth chamber experiment with seeds and soil microbial communities from three origins to investigate the impact of temperature and soil moisture on the growth, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization, and root-associated fungal community of a perennial herb. Moreover, we tested whether plants and AM fungi performed better or worse when plants were grown with their local soil biota, e.g. due to plant adaptation or changes in the genetic or species composition of the soil microbial community.

3. Temperature and soil moisture generally increased plant growth, whereas temperature but not soil moisture, increased AM fungal colonization. The strength and direction of the plants’ response to temperature was dependent on soil moisture and differed among plant populations, and AM fungal colonization was further affected by the origin of the soil microbial community. The root-associated fungal community structure was impacted by temperature, soil moisture and the soil microbial origin, with interactive effects between the microbial origin and the abiotic environment. Plant biomass was lower when plants were grown with their local soil microbes, potentially due to intraspecific negative plant-soil feedbacks.

4. Synthesis. Our findings indicate that, beyond a relatively uniform increase of plant growth and AM fungal colonization with increasing temperature, plants and root-associated fungi of different origins will vary in their response to climate change (i.e. elevated temperature and shifts in rainfall). This may create pronounced, but difficult to predict, spatial and temporal variation in the ecology and evolution of plant–microbe interactions with a changing climate.

Location

Sweden
Tullgarn
Östra Ryd
Stockholm