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Data from: Out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation experience, confidence, and confidence-associated factors among Northern Japanese emergency life-saving technicians: a population-based cross-sectional study

Citation

Ono, Yuko et al. (2018), Data from: Out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation experience, confidence, and confidence-associated factors among Northern Japanese emergency life-saving technicians: a population-based cross-sectional study, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.f1vn500

Abstract

Objective: Clinical procedural experience and confidence are both important when performing complex medical procedures. Because out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) is a complex intervention, we sought to clarify clinical ETI experience among prehospital rescuers as well as their confidence in performing ETI and confidence-associated factors. Design: Population-based cross-sectional study conducted from January to September 2017. Setting: Northern Japan, including eight prefectures. Participants: Emergency life-saving technicians (ELSTs) authorized to perform ETI. Outcome measures: Annual ETI exposure and confidence in performing ETI, according to a 5-point Likert scale. To determine factors associated with ETI confidence, differences between confident ELSTs (those scoring 4 or 5 on the Likert scale) and non-confident ELSTs were evaluated. Results: Questionnaires were sent to 149 fire departments; 140 agreed to participate. Among the 2821 ELSTs working at responding fire departments, 2620 returned the questionnaire (response rate, 92.9%); complete data sets were available for 2567 ELSTs (complete response rate, 91.0%). Of those 2567 respondents, 95.7% performed two or fewer ETI annually; 46.6% reported lack of confidence in performing ETI. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that years of clinical experience (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.13), annual ETI exposure (AOR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.59–2.03), and the availability of ETI skill retention programs including regular simulation training (AOR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02–1.68) and operating room training (AOR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.14–1.83) were independently associated with confidence in performing ETI. Conclusions: ETI is an uncommon event for most ELSTs and nearly half of respondents did not have confidence in performing this procedure. Because confidence in ETI was independently associated with availability of regular simulation and operating room training, standardization of ETI reeducation that incorporates such methods may be useful for prehospital rescuers.

Usage Notes

Location

Northern Japan