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Data from: Exposure to phages has little impact on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance on drug concentration gradients

Citation

Zhang, Quan-Guo (2013), Data from: Exposure to phages has little impact on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance on drug concentration gradients, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.f9h64

Abstract

The use of phages for treating bacterial pathogens has recently been advocated as an alternative to antibiotic therapy. Here we test a hypothesis that bacteria treated with phages may show more limited evolution of antibiotic resistance as the fitness costs of resistance to phages may add to those of antibiotic resistance, further reducing the growth performance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We did this by studying the evolution of phage-exposed and phage-free Pseudomonas fluorescens cultures on concentration gradients of single drugs, including cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin. During drug treatment, the level of bacterial antibiotic resistance increased through time, and was not affected by the phage treatment. Exposure to phages did not cause slower growth in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, although it did so in antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. We observed significant reversion of antibiotic resistance after drug use being terminated, and the rate of reversion was not affected by the phage treatment. The results suggest that the fitness costs caused by resistance to phages are unlikely to be an important constraint on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance in heterogeneous drug environments. Further studies are needed for the interaction of fitness costs of antibiotic resistance with other factors.

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