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Data from: Microgeographic maladaptive performance and deme depression in response to roads and runoff

Citation

Brady, Steven P. (2013), Data from: Microgeographic maladaptive performance and deme depression in response to roads and runoff, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.fb8tk

Abstract

Despite theoretical understanding and empirical detection of local adaptation in natural environments, our knowledge of such divergence in fragmented habitats remains limited, especially in the context of microgeographic spatial scales and contemporary time scales. I used a combination of reciprocal transplant and common garden exposure experiments to evaluate potential microgeographic divergence in a pool-breeding amphibian occupying a landscape fragmented by roads. As indicated by reduced rates of survival and increased rates of malformation, I found evidence for maladaptation in road adjacent populations. This response is in direct counterpoint to recently described local adaption by a cohabiting species of amphibian. These results suggest that while divergence might commonly follow habitat modification, the direction of its outcome cannot be generalized even in identical habitats. Further, maladaptive responses can be associated with a more generalized depression effect that transcends the local environment. Alongside recent reports, these results suggest that maladaptive responses may be an emerging consequence of human-induced environmental change. Thus future studies should carefully consider the population unit as a key level for inference.

Usage Notes

Location

Yale Myers Forest
Northeastern Connecticut
41.949420N
72.121084W