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Data from: Structural diversity of naturally regenerating Chinese yew (Taxus wallichiana var. mairei) populations in an ex situ conservation

Citation

Zhang, Guangfu et al. (2017), Data from: Structural diversity of naturally regenerating Chinese yew (Taxus wallichiana var. mairei) populations in an ex situ conservation, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.fh8b8

Abstract

The Chinese yew (Taxus wallichiana var. mairei) is ranked among the first class of important wild endangered plants in China. However, due to its overexploitation, it now occurs scattered in the forest undergrowth along the Yangtze River Valley. To improve this tree’s conservation management, we used structural indices to investigate the structural diversity of naturally regenerating yew populations that have established via ex situ conservation. The results show that most yews had larger non-yew tree neighbors; these were 30–70% larger than their reference trees. Collectively, the average distances between the yews and the three nearest-neighboring trees were short (<3 m). This result suggests that the yews likely face strong interspecific competition from neighbors. In these two forest stands, most of the pole-sized yews are found beneath a single tall neighboring tree (height ≥10 m), and their growth was enhanced under a single neighboring tree but not under two, three or zero neighboring trees. Finally, we recommend simple silvicultural treatments to reduce interspecific competition; specifically, the cutting or pruning of branches of large neighboring trees in tandem with the thinning of canopy trees growing next to the mother yews.

Usage Notes

Location

China