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The moment of tooth: rate, fate, and pattern of Pacific lingcod dentition revealed by pulse-chase

Citation

Carr, Emily; Summers, Adam; Cohen, Karly (2021), The moment of tooth: rate, fate, and pattern of Pacific lingcod dentition revealed by pulse-chase, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.fj6q573vt

Abstract

Tooth replacement rates of polyphyodont cartilaginous and bony fishes are hard to determine because of lack of obvious patterning, and maintaining specimens long enough to observe replacement. Pulse-chase is a fluorescent technique that differentially colours developing mineralized tissue. We present in-situ tooth replacement rate and position data for the oral and pharyngeal detentions of Ophiodon elongatus (Pacific lingcod). We assessed over 10,000 teeth, in 20 fish, and found a daily replacement rate of about two teeth (3.6% of the dentition). The average tooth is in the dental battery for 27 days. Replacement was higher in the lower pharyngeal jaw (LPJ). We found no difference between replacement rates of feeding and non-feeding fish, suggesting feeding was not a driver of tooth replacement. Lingcod teeth have both a size and location fate; smaller teeth at one spot will not grow into larger teeth, even if a large tooth nearby is lost. We also found increased rates of replacement at the posterior of the LPJ relative to the anterior. We propose that lingcod teeth do not migrate in the jaw as they develop; their teeth are fated in size and location, erupting in their functional position.