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Data from: Accuracy in the prediction of disease epidemics when ensembling simple but highly correlated models

Citation

Shah, Denis; De Wolf, Erick; Paul, Pierce; Madden, Laurence (2021), Data from: Accuracy in the prediction of disease epidemics when ensembling simple but highly correlated models, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.fn2z34trv

Abstract

Ensembling combines the predictions made by individual component base models with the goal of achieving a predictive accuracy that is better than that of any one of the constituent member models. Diversity among the base models in terms of predictions is a crucial criterion in ensembling. However, there are practical instances when the available base models produce highly correlated predictions, because they may have been developed within the same research group or may have been built from the same underlying algorithm. We investigated, via a case study on Fusarium head blight (FHB) on wheat in the U.S., whether ensembles of simple yet highly correlated models for predicting the risk of FHB epidemics, all generated from logistic regression, provided any benefit to predictive performance, despite relatively low levels of base model diversity.  Three ensembling methods were explored: soft voting, weighted averaging of smaller subsets of the base models, and penalized regression as a stacking algorithm. Soft voting and weighted model averages were generally better at classification than the base models, though not universally so. The performances of stacked regression were superior to those of the other two ensembling methods we analyzed in this study. Ensembling simple yet correlated models is computationally feasible and is therefore worth pursuing for models of epidemic risk.

Funding

U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative

U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative