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Data from: Parallel signatures of selection at genomic islands of divergence and the major histocompatibility complex in ecotypes of sockeye salmon across Alaska

Citation

Larson, Wesley A. et al. (2019), Data from: Parallel signatures of selection at genomic islands of divergence and the major histocompatibility complex in ecotypes of sockeye salmon across Alaska, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.fn4cj0d

Abstract

Understanding the genetic mechanisms that facilitate adaptive radiation is an important component of evolutionary biology. Here, we genotyped 82 neutral SNPs, seven SNPs in islands of divergence identified in a previous study (island SNPs), and a region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in 32 populations of sockeye salmon to investigate whether conserved genes and genomic regions are involved in adaptive radiation. Populations representing three ecotypes were sampled from seven drainages with differing habitats and colonization histories spanning a range of 2,000 km. We found strong signatures of parallel selection across drainages at the island SNPs and MHC, suggesting that the same loci undergo divergent selection during adaptive radiation. However, patterns of differentiation at most island SNPs and the MHC were not associated with ecotypes, suggesting that these loci are responding differently to a mosaic of selective pressures. Our study provides some of the first evidence that conserved genomic islands may be involved in adaptive divergence of salmon populations. Additionally, our data provide further support for the hypothesis that sockeye salmon inhabiting rivers unconnected to lakes harbor similar genetic diversity across large distances, are likely the ancestral form of the species, and have repeatedly recolonized lake systems as they have become available after glacial recession. Finally, our results highlight the value and importance of validating outlier loci by screening additional populations and regions, a practice that will hopefully become more common in the future.

Usage Notes

Location

Alaska