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Data from: Effectiveness of physically ablative and pharmacological treatments for anal condyloma in HIV-infected men

Citation

Vela, Sandra et al. (2019), Data from: Effectiveness of physically ablative and pharmacological treatments for anal condyloma in HIV-infected men, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.fn74266

Abstract

There is limited information on the effectiveness of available treatments for anal condyloma acuminata in HIV-1-infected men. AIM: To provide data on the effectiveness of electrosurgical excision, infrared coagulation and pharmacological (imiquimod) treatments for anal condyloma acuminata (peri-anal and/or intra-anal) in HIV-1-infected men based on authors' practice. METHODS: Single-center, retrospective descriptive analysis of HIV-1-infected men, 18 years or older treated for anal condyloma acuminata. Standard treatments were offered: electrosurgery excision, infrared coagulation and topical imiquimod. Effectiveness was evaluated by the recurrence rate at 1 year after treatment. Recurrence was defined as any anal condyloma acuminata diagnosed after 3 months of condyloma-free survival post-treatment. Anal cytology and human-papillomavirus-infection (HPV) was assessed. RESULTS: Between January 2005 and May 2009, 101 men were treated for anal condyloma acuminata: 65 (64%) with electrosurgery, 27 (27%) with infrared coagulation and 9 (9%) with imiquimod. At 1 year after treatment, the cumulative recurrence rate was 8% (4/65, 95%CI: 2-15%) with electrosurgery excision, 11% (3/27, 95%CI: 4-28%) with infrared coagulation and 11% (1/9, 95%CI: 2-44%) with imiquimod treatment. No predictive factors were associated with recurrence. Anal HPV-6 or HPV-11 was detectable in 98 (97%) patients and all had high-risk HPV genotypes, and 89 (88%) patients had abnormal anal canal cytology. Limitations: this was a retrospective descriptive analysis; limited to a single center; it cannot know if the recurrence is related to new infection. CONCLUSION. Recurrence of anal condyloma after any treatment was common. Abnormal anal cytology and high-risk HPV-infection were highly prevalent in this population, therefore at high-risk of anal cancer, and warrants careful follow-up.

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Location

Spain