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Data from: Selfing ability and dispersal are positively related, but not affected by range position, across multiple species of southern African Asteraceae

Citation

de Waal, Caroli; Rodger, James G.; Anderson, B.; Ellis, Allan G. (2014), Data from: Selfing ability and dispersal are positively related, but not affected by range position, across multiple species of southern African Asteraceae, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.fp023

Abstract

Dispersal and breeding system traits are thought to affect colonization success. As species have attained their present distribution ranges through colonization, these traits may vary geographically. Although several theories predict associations between dispersal ability, selfing ability and the relative position of a population within its geographic range, there is little theoretical or empirical consensus on exactly how these three variables are related. We investigated relationships between dispersal ability, selfing ability and range position across 28 populations of 13 annual, wind-dispersed Asteraceae species from the Namaqualand region of South Africa. Controlling for phylogeny, relative dispersal ability – assessed from vertical fall time of fruits – was positively related to an index of autofertility – determined from hand-pollination experiments. These findings support the existence of two discrete syndromes: high selfing ability associated with good dispersal and obligate outcrossing associated with lower dispersal ability. This is consistent with the hypothesis that selection for colonization success drives the evolution of an association between these traits. However, no general effect of range position on dispersal or breeding system traits was evident. This suggests selection on both breeding system and dispersal traits acts consistently across distribution ranges.

Usage Notes

Location

Nieuwoudtville
South Africa
Namaqualand
Northern Cape Province
Western Cape Province