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Data from: Association of body mass index and age with incident diabetes in Chinese adults: a population-based cohort study

Citation

Chen, Ying et al. (2018), Data from: Association of body mass index and age with incident diabetes in Chinese adults: a population-based cohort study, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ft8750v

Abstract

Objective. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing in young adults, and greater adiposity is considered a major risk factor. However, whether there is an association between obesity and diabetes and how this might be impacted by age is not clear. Therefore, we investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and diabetes across a wide range of age groups (20-30, 30-40, 40-50, 50-60, 60-70, ≥70 years old). Design. We performed a retrospective cohort study using healthy screening program data. Setting. A total of 211,833 adult Chinese persons > 20-years-old across 32 sites and 11 cities in China (Shanghai, Beijing, Nanjing, Suzhou, Shenzhen, Changzhou, Chengdu, Guangzhou, Hefei, Wuhan, Nantong) were selected for the study; these persons were free of diabetes at baseline. Primary and secondary outcome measures. Fasting plasma glucose levels were measured and information regarding the history of diabetes was collected at each visit. Diabetes was diagnosed as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.00 mmol/L and/or self-reported diabetes. Patients were censored at the date of diagnosis or the final visit, whichever came first. Results. With a median follow-up of 3.1 years, 4,174 of the 211,833 participants developed diabetes, with an age-adjusted incidence rate of 7.35 per 1,000 persons. The risk of incident diabetes increased proportionally with increasing baseline BMI values, with a 23% increased risk of incident diabetes with each kg/m2 increase in BMI (95%CI: 1.22, 1.24). Across all age groups, there was a linear association between BMI and the risk of incident diabetes, although there was a stronger association between BMI and incident diabetes in the younger age groups (age × BMI interaction, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. An increased BMI is also independently associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes in young adults and the effects of BMI on incident diabetes were accentuated in younger adults.

Usage Notes

Location

China