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Data from: Interacting effects of predation risk and resource level on escape speed of amphibian larvae along a latitudinal gradient

Citation

Lindgren, Beatrice; Orizaola, Germán; Laurila, Anssi (2018), Data from: Interacting effects of predation risk and resource level on escape speed of amphibian larvae along a latitudinal gradient, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.g14qq07

Abstract

Fast-growing genotypes living in time-constrained environments are often more prone to predation, suggesting that growth-predation risk trade-offs are important factors maintaining variation in growth along climatic gradients. However, the mechanisms underlying how fast growth increases predation-mediated mortality are not well understood. Here, we investigated if slow-growing, low-latitude individuals have faster escape swimming speed than fast-growing high-latitude individuals using common frog (Rana temporaria) tadpoles from eight populations collected along a 1500 km latitudinal gradient. We measured escape speed in terms of burst and endurance speeds in tadpoles raised in the laboratory at two food levels and in the presence and absence of a predator (Aeshna dragonfly larvae). We did not find any latitudinal trend in escape speed performance. In low food treatments, burst speed was higher in tadpoles reared with predators but did not differ between high food treatments. Endurance speed, on the contrary, was lower in high-food tadpoles reared with predators, and did not differ between treatments at low food levels. Tadpoles reared with predators showed inducible morphology (increased relative body size and tail depth), which had positive effects on speed endurance at low but not at high food levels. Burst speed was positively affected by tail length and tail muscle size in the absence of predators. Our results suggest that escape speed does not trade off with fast growth along the latitudinal gradient in R. temporaria tadpoles. Instead, escape speed is a plastic trait and strongly influenced by the interaction between resource level and predation risk.

Usage Notes

Location

Sweden