Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Interspecific aggression among parapatric and sympatric songbirds on a tropical elevational gradient

Citation

Boyce, Andrew; Martin, Thomas (2018), Data from: Interspecific aggression among parapatric and sympatric songbirds on a tropical elevational gradient, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.gc06qt7

Abstract

Interspecific competition is hypothesized to be a strong force that sets species range limits and drives parapatric distributions of closely related species on tropical mountains. Yet, experimental evidence that competition drives spatial segregation of closely related species on elevational gradients is rare. To test whether competition limits elevational ranges of tropical songbirds, we conducted reciprocal playback experiments on two pairs of species with adjacent but non-overlapping (parapatric) distributions and one pair of sympatric species. We found asymmetric interspecific aggression in one parapatric pair (Pycnonotidae) and a complete absence of interspecific aggression in the other (Zosteropidae). We also found asymmetric interspecies aggression in a pair of sympatric flycatchers (Muscicapidae). Our results indicate that interspecific aggression may set range limits in some cases, but it is not a prerequisite for parapatry. Furthermore, the presence of interspecific aggression between co-occurring relatives suggests that while competition may play a role in limiting species distributions, interspecific aggression alone is not sufficient evidence to assert that competition is the primary driver of parapatric distributions.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1241041, DEB-1651283, IOS-1656120

Location

Borneo
Malaysia