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Data from: Abundance-dependent effects of neighborhood dissimilarity and growth rank reversal in a Neotropical forest

Citation

Chen, Yuxin; Umaña, María Natalia; Uriarte, María; Yu, Shixiao (2018), Data from: Abundance-dependent effects of neighborhood dissimilarity and growth rank reversal in a Neotropical forest, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.gk76q

Abstract

Why tropical forests harbor an exceptional number of species with striking differences in abundances remains an open question. We propose a theoretical framework to address this question in which rare species may have different extirpation risks depending on species ranks in tree growth and sensitivities to neighborhood interactions. To evaluate the framework, we studied tree growth and its responses to neighborhood dissimilarity (ND) in traits and phylogeny for 146 species in a Neotropical forest. We found that tree growth was positively related to ND, and common species were more strongly affected by ND than rare species, which may help delay dominance of common species. Rare species grew more slowly at the community-wide average ND than common species. But rare species grew faster when common species tended to dominate locally, which may help reduce extirpation risk of rare species. Our study highlights that tree growth rank among species depends on their responses to neighborhood interactions, which can be important in fostering diversity maintenance in tropical forests.

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