Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: How sea-level change mediates genetic divergence in coastal species across regions with varying tectonic and sediment processes

Citation

Dolby, Greer A.; Ellingson, Ryan A.; Findley, Lloyd T.; Jacobs, David K. (2018), Data from: How sea-level change mediates genetic divergence in coastal species across regions with varying tectonic and sediment processes, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.gm1td

Abstract

Plate tectonics and sediment processes control regional continental shelf topography. We examine the genetic consequences of how glacial-associated sea-level change interacted with variable near-shore topography since the last glaciation. We reconstructed the size and distribution of areas suitable for tidal estuary formation from the Last Glacial Maximum, ~20 thousand years ago, to present from San Francisco, California, USA (~38 °N) to Reforma, Sinaloa, Mexico (~25 °N). We assessed range-wide genetic structure and diversity of three co-distributed tidal estuarine fishes (California Killifish, Shadow Goby, Longjaw Mudsucker) along ~4,600 km using mitochondrial control region and cytB sequence, and 16–20 microsatellite loci from a total of 524 individuals. Results show that glacial-associated sea-level change limited estuarine habitat to few, widely separated refugia at glacial lowstand, and present-day genetic clades were sourced from specific refugia. Habitat increased during postglacial sea-level rise and refugial populations admixed in newly formed habitats. Continental shelves with active tectonics and/or low sediment supply were steep and hosted fewer, smaller refugia with more genetically differentiated populations than on broader shelves. Approximate Bayesian computation favored the refuge-recolonization scenarios from habitat models over isolation by distance and seaway alternatives, indicating isolation at lowstand is a major diversification mechanism among estuarine (and perhaps other) coastal species. Because sea-level change is a global phenomenon, we suggest this top-down physical control of extirpation-isolation-recolonization may be an important driver of genetic diversification in coastal taxa inhabiting other topographically complex coasts globally during the Mid- to Late Pleistocene and deeper timescales.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: NSF DDIG-1110538

Location

Baja California Sur
Gulf of California
Sea of Cortez
Baja California
Sinaloa
California
Sonora