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Data from: Intra-sexual selection: kin competition increases male-male territorial aggression in a monogamous cichlid fish

Citation

Vitt, Simon; Hiller, Jenny; Thünken, Timo (2021), Data from: Intra-sexual selection: kin competition increases male-male territorial aggression in a monogamous cichlid fish, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.gxd2547jc

Abstract

During intrasexual competition, individuals of the same sex compete for access to breeding sites and mating partners, often accompanied by aggressive behavior. Kin selection theory predicts different kin directed social interactions ranging from cooperation to aggression depending on the context and the resource in question. Kin competition reducing indirect fitness might be avoided by actively expelling relatives from territories and by showing higher aggression against kin. The West-African cichlid Pelvicachromis taeniatus is a monogamous cave breeder with males occupying and defending breeding sites against rivals. This species is capable of kin recognition and shows kin-preference during juvenile shoaling and mate choice. However, sub-adults of P. taeniatus seem to avoid the proximity of same-sex kin. In the present study, we examined territorial aggression of territory holders against intruding related and unrelated males as well as intruder’s behavior. We observed higher aggression among related competitors suggesting that related males are less tolerated as neighbors. Avoidance of intra-sexual competition with relatives might increase indirect fitness of males in monogamous species.

Funding

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Award: TH 1615/3-1