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Supporting data for: Risk factors common to leading eye health conditions and major non-communicable diseases: A rapid review and commentary

Citation

Keay, Lisa et al. (2022), Supporting data for: Risk factors common to leading eye health conditions and major non-communicable diseases: A rapid review and commentary, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.gxd2547q0

Abstract

Background: To gain an understanding of the intersection of risk factors between the most prevalent eye health conditions that are associated with vision impairment and non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Methods: A series of rapid reviews of reviews reporting on non-modifiable risk factors, age and sex, and modifiable risk factors, including social determinants, were conducted for five common eye health conditions that are the leading causes of vision impairment globally (refractive error including uncorrected refractive error, cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy) and five prevalent NCDs (cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, dementia, and depressive disorders).

Results: Eye health conditions and NCDs share many risk factors. Increased age was found to be the most common shared risk factor, associated with increased risks of AMD, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, refractive error, cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and dementia. Other shared risk factors included smoking, obesity, alcohol consumption (mixed results), and physical activity was protective, though limited evidence was found for eye conditions. Social determinants are well documented as risk factors for NCDs.

Conclusion: There is substantial overlap in common established risk factors for the most frequent vision-impairing eye conditions and leading NCDs. Increasing efforts should be made to integrate preventative and risk reduction interventions to improve health, with the greatest shared benefits for initiatives that aim to reduce smoking, improve diet, and promote physical activity.

Funding

Fred Hollows Foundation

Wellcome Trust, Award: 207472/Z/17/Z