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Data from: Trap colour of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia does not serve a prey attraction or camouflage function.

Citation

Foot, George; Rice, Steven P.; Millett, Jonathan (2014), Data from: Trap colour of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia does not serve a prey attraction or camouflage function., Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.h7s03

Abstract

The traps of many carnivorous plants are red in colour. This has been widely hypothesized to serve a prey attraction function; colour has also been hypothesized to function as camouflage, preventing prey avoidance. We tested these two hypotheses in situ for the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia. We conducted three separate studies: (i) prey attraction to artificial traps to isolate the influence of colour; (ii) prey attraction to artificial traps on artificial backgrounds to control the degree of contrast and (iii) observation of prey capture by D. rotundifolia to determine the effects of colour on prey capture. Prey were not attracted to green traps and were deterred from red traps. There was no evidence that camouflaged traps caught more prey. For D. rotundifolia, there was a relationship between trap colour and prey capture. However, trap colour may be confounded with other leaf traits. Thus, we conclude that for D. rotundifolia, red trap colour does not serve a prey attraction or camouflage function.

Usage Notes

Location

South Yorkshire
Humberside
Humberhead Levels
-0.907475W
UK
England
United Kingdom
53.627891N
British Isles