Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Assessing the genetic diversity in Argopecten nucleus (Bivalvia: Pectinidae), a functional hermaphrodite species with extremely low population density and self-fertilization: effect of null alleles

Citation

Barros Gómez, Judith; Winkler, Federico M.; Velasco, Luz A. (2021), Assessing the genetic diversity in Argopecten nucleus (Bivalvia: Pectinidae), a functional hermaphrodite species with extremely low population density and self-fertilization: effect of null alleles, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.h9w0vt4f0

Abstract

Argopecten nucleus is a functional hermaphroditic pectinid species that exhibits self-fertilization, whose natural populations have usually very low densities. In the present study, the genetic diversity of a wild population from Neguanje Bay, Santa Marta (Colombia), was estimated using microsatellite markers, and the effect of the presence of null alleles on this estimation was assessed. A total of 8 microsatellite markers were developed, the first described for this species, and their amplification conditions were standardized. They were used to determine the genotype of 48 wild individuals from Naguanje Bay, and 1010 individuals derived from the offspring of 38 directed crosses. For each locus, the frequencies of the identified alleles, including null alleles, were estimated using the statistical package Micro-Checker, and the parental genotypes were confirmed using segregation analysis. Three to 8 alleles per locus with frequencies from 0.001 to 0.632 were detected. The frequencies of null alleles ranged from 0.10 to 0.45, with Ho from 0.0 to 0.79 and He from 0.53 to 0.80. All loci were in H-W disequilibrium. The null alleles frequencies values were high, with lower estimations using segregation analysis than estimated using Micro-Checker. The present results show high levels of population genetic diversity, and indicate that null alleles were not the only cause of deviation from HW equilibrium in all loci, suggesting that the wild population under study presents signs of inbreeding and Wahlun effect.