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Flower–visitor specimens preserved in the Kyoto University Museum

Citation

Kishi, Shigeki; Kakutani, Takehiko (2020), Flower–visitor specimens preserved in the Kyoto University Museum, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.hdr7sqvd1

Abstract

This is a modified dataset of flower-visitors published by three papers (Inoue et al. 1990, Kakutani et al. 1990, Kato et al. 1990). Authors and their students of Kyoto University collected flower-visiting insects as part of a practical seminar at three research sites in Kyoto, Japan in the 1980s. They also recorded the name of the plant species where visitor insects were collected. Specimens of collected insects have been preserved in the Kyoto University museum. We checked the preserved status of each specimen and modified the data list.

References:

Inoue T, Kato M, Kakutani T, Suka T, Itino T. 1990. Insect-flower relationship in the temperate deciduous forest of Kibune, Kyoto: an overview of the flowering phenology and the seasonal pattern of insect visits. Contr. Biol. Lab. Kyoto Univ. 27, 377–463.

Kakutani T, Inoue T, Kato M, Ichihashi H. 1990. Insect-flower relationship in the campus of Kyoto University, Kyoto: an overview of the flowering phenology and the seasonal pattern of insect visits. Contr. Biol. Lab. Kyoto Univ. 27, 465–521.

Kato M, Kakutani T, Inoue T, Itino T. 1990. Insect-flower relationship in the primary beech forest of Ashu, Kyoto: an overview of the flowering phenology and the seasonal pattern of insect visits. Contr. Biol. Lab. Kyoto Univ. 27, 309–375.

Methods

Researchers and their students collected flower-visiting insects as part of a practical seminar at three study sites in Kyoto, Japan in the 1980s: Ashu (35°20’34”N, 135°45’32”E), 1984 to 1987 (Kato et al., 1990), Kibune (35°08’04’’N, 135°45’51”E), 1984 to 1987 (Inoue et al., 1990), and the Yoshida campus of Kyoto university (35°01’50’’N, 135°47’13”E), 1985 to 1987 (Kakutani et al., 1990). Insect collections were conducted on sunny days, 8–19 times at Ashu, 5–10 times at Kibune, and 32–49 times at the campus of Kyoto University from April to Novermber, by using insect nets for 10 minutes at a location in front of flowering plants along census routes (Kato et al. 1990). When collecting insects, they also recorded the name of the plant species visited by collected insects. Specimens of collected insects have been preserved in the Kyoto University museum. Detailed information may be found in those papers (Inoue et al., 1990; Kakutani et al., 1990; Kato et al., 1990).

We checked the preserved status of each insect specimen and modified the dataset. If specimens were missed, ill-conditioned, and sex-unknown, we removed the data from the dataset and revised classification of misidentified specimens. We then generated a modified dataset that contains reference number, collection date, collection year, collection site, insect order, family, genus, species (or sp.), its sex and plant species.

Funding

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: JP25291102

Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan