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Data from: Adaptive patterns of phenotypic plasticity in laboratory and field environments in Drosophila melanogaster

Citation

Mathur, Vinayak; Schmidt, Paul S. (2016), Data from: Adaptive patterns of phenotypic plasticity in laboratory and field environments in Drosophila melanogaster, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.hj5m4

Abstract

Identifying mechanisms of adaptation to variable environments is essential in developing a comprehensive understanding of evolutionary dynamics in natural populations. Phenotypic plasticity allows for phenotypic change in response to changes in the environment, and as such may play a major role in adaptation to environmental heterogeneity. Here, the plasticity of stress response in D. melanogaster originating from two distinct geographic regions and ecological habitats was examined. Adults were given a short-term, 5-day exposure to combinations of temperature and photoperiod to elicit a plastic response for three fundamental aspects of stress tolerance that vary adaptively with geography. This was replicated in both the laboratory and in outdoor enclosures in the field. In the laboratory, geographic origin was the primary determinant of the stress response. Temperature and the interaction between temperature and photoperiod also significantly affected stress resistance. In the outdoor enclosures, plasticity was distinct among traits and between geographic regions. These results demonstrate that short-term exposure of adults to ecologically relevant environmental cues results in predictable effects on multiple aspects of fitness. These patterns of plasticity vary among traits and are highly distinct between the two examined geographic regions, consistent with patterns of local adaptation to climate and associated environmental parameters.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-0921307

Location

North America