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Data from: Poison frog color morphs express assortative mate preferences in allopatry but not sympatry

Citation

Yang, Yusan; Richards-Zawacki, Corinne L.; Devar, Anisha; Dugas, Matthew B. (2016), Data from: Poison frog color morphs express assortative mate preferences in allopatry but not sympatry, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.hm505

Abstract

The concurrent divergence of mating traits and preferences is necessary for the evolution of reproductive isolation via sexual selection, and such coevolution has been demonstrated in diverse lineages. However, the extent to which assortative mate preferences are sufficient to drive reproductive isolation in nature is less clear. Natural contact zones between lineages divergent in traits and preferences provide exceptional opportunities for testing the predicted evolutionary consequences of such divergence. The strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) displays extreme color polymorphism in and around the young Bocas del Toro archipelago. In a transition zone between red and blue allopatric lineages, we asked whether female preferences diverged along with coloration, and whether any divergent preferences persist in a zone of sympatry. When choosing among red, blue and phenotypically intermediate males, females from monomorphic red and monomorphic blue populations both expressed assortative preferences. However, red, blue, and intermediate females from the contact zone all preferred red males, suggesting that divergent preferences may be insufficient to effect behavioral isolation. Our results highlight the complexity of behavioral isolation, and the need for studies that can reveal the circumstances under which divergent preferences do and do not contribute to speciation.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: 1146370

Location

Bocas del Toro