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Data from: Social foragers adopt a riskier foraging mode in the centre of their groups

Citation

Beauchamp, Guy (2014), Data from: Social foragers adopt a riskier foraging mode in the centre of their groups, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.hm690

Abstract

Foraging in groups provides many benefits that are not necessarily experienced the same way by all individuals. I explore the possibility that foraging mode, the way individuals exploit resources, varies as a function of spatial position in the group, reflecting commonly occurring spatial differences in predation risk. I show that semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla), a social foraging avian species, tended to adopt a riskier foraging mode in the central, more protected areas of their groups. Central birds effectively used the more peripheral group members as sentinels, allowing them to exploit a wider range of resources within the same group at the same time. This finding provides a novel benefit of living in groups, which may have a broad relevance given that social foraging species often exploit a large array of resources.

Usage Notes

Location

Bay of Fundy