Skip to main content
Dryad logo

The Immp2l mutation causes ovarian aging through ROS-wnt/β-catenin-estrogen (cyp19a1) pathway: preventive effect of melatonin

Citation

He, Qing et al. (2020), The Immp2l mutation causes ovarian aging through ROS-wnt/β-catenin-estrogen (cyp19a1) pathway: preventive effect of melatonin , Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.hmgqnk9db

Abstract

Mitochondria play important roles in ovarian follicle development. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial gene deficiency, impairs the ovarian development. Here, we explored the role and mechanism of mitochondrial inner membrane gene Immp2l in ovarian follicle growth and development. Our results revealed that the female Immp2l-/- mice were infertile, while the Immp2l+/- mice were normal. Body and ovarian weights were reduced in the female Immp2l-/- mice, ovarian follicle growth and development were stunted in the secondary follicle stage. Although a few ovarian follicles were ovulated, the oocytes were not fertilized due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Increased oxidative stress, decreased estrogen levels, and altered genes expression of Wnt/β-catenin and steroid hormone synthesis pathways were observed in 28-day-old Immp2l-/- mice. The Immp2l mutation accelerated ovarian aging process, as no ovarian follicles were detected in age of 5 months in Immp2l-/- mice. All the aforementioned changes in the Immp2l-/- mice were reversed by administration of antioxidant melatonin to the Immp2l-/- mice. Furthermore, our in vitro study using Immp2l knockdown granulosa cells confirmed that the Immp2l downregulation induced granulosa cell aging by enhancing ROS levels, suppressing Wnt16, increasing β-catenin and decreasing steroid hormone synthesis gene cyp19a1 and estrogen levels, accompanied by an increase in the aging phenotype of granulosa cells. Melatonin treatment delayed granulosa cell aging progression. Taken together, Immp2l causes ovarian aging through the ROS-Wnt/β-catenin-estrogen (cyp19a1) pathway, which can be reversed by melatonin treatment.Mitochondria play important roles in ovarian follicle development. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial gene deficiency, impairs the ovarian development. Here, we explored the role and mechanism of mitochondrial inner membrane gene Immp2l in ovarian follicle growth and development. Our results revealed that the female Immp2l-/- mice were infertile, while the Immp2l+/- mice were normal. Body and ovarian weights were reduced in the female Immp2l-/- mice, ovarian follicle growth and development were stunted in the secondary follicle stage. Although a few ovarian follicles were ovulated, the oocytes were not fertilized due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Increased oxidative stress, decreased estrogen levels, and altered genes expression of Wnt/β-catenin and steroid hormone synthesis pathways were observed in 28-day-old Immp2l-/- mice. The Immp2l mutation accelerated ovarian aging process, as no ovarian follicles were detected in age of 5 months in Immp2l-/- mice. All the aforementioned changes in the Immp2l-/- mice were reversed by administration of antioxidant melatonin to the Immp2l-/- mice. Furthermore, our in vitro study using Immp2l knockdown granulosa cells confirmed that the Immp2l downregulation induced granulosa cell aging by enhancing ROS levels, suppressing Wnt16, increasing β-catenin and decreasing steroid hormone synthesis gene cyp19a1 and estrogen levels, accompanied by an increase in the aging phenotype of granulosa cells. Melatonin treatment delayed granulosa cell aging progression. Taken together, Immp2l causes ovarian aging through the ROS-Wnt/β-catenin-estrogen (cyp19a1) pathway, which can be reversed by melatonin treatment.

Funding

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: 818,602,628,176,024,000,000,000

Ningxia Medical University, Award: XY201808

National Natural Science Foundation of Ningxia, Award: 2020AAC02020

Key Research and Development Program of Ningxia, Award: 2019BFG2007

Ningxia Innovation Team of the Foundation and Clinical Researches of Diabetes and Its Complications, Award: NXKJT2019010