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Data from: Novel and disappearing climates in the global surface ocean from 1800 to 2100

Citation

Lotterhos, Katie (2021), Data from: Novel and disappearing climates in the global surface ocean from 1800 to 2100, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ht76hdrgb

Abstract

Marine ecosystems are experiencing unprecedented warming and acidification caused by anthropogenic carbon dioxide. For the global sea surface, we quantified the degree that present climates are disappearing and novel climates (without recent analogs) are emerging, spanning from 1800 through different emission scenarios to 2100. We quantified the sea surface environment based on model estimates of carbonate chemistry and temperature. Between 1800 and 2000, no gridpoints on the ocean surface were estimated to have experienced an extreme degree of global disappearance or novelty. In other words, the majority of environmental shifts since 1800 were not novel, which is consistent with evidence that marine species have been able to track shifting environments via dispersal. However, between 2000 and 2100 under Representative Concentrations Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5 projections, 10–82% of the surface ocean is estimated to experience an extreme degree of global novelty. Additionally, 35–95% of the surface ocean is estimated to experience an extreme degree of global disappearance. These upward estimates of climate novelty and disappearance are larger than those predicted for terrestrial systems. Without mitigation, many species will face rapidly disappearing or novel climates that cannot be outpaced by dispersal and may require evolutionary adaptation to keep pace.

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: 16,354,231,655,701

National Science Foundation, Ocean Acidification PI Workshop, Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program, Award: 1558412

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ocean Acidification Program, Award: 1842-1210