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Data from: Complex inter-kingdom interactions: carnivorous plants affect growth of an aquatic vertebrate

Citation

Davenport, Jon M.; Riley, Alex W. (2018), Data from: Complex inter-kingdom interactions: carnivorous plants affect growth of an aquatic vertebrate, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.j2130

Abstract

1. Coexistence of organisms in nature is more likely when phenotypic similarities of individuals are reduced. Despite the lack of similarity, distantly related taxa still compete intensely for shared resources. No larger difference between organisms that share a common prey could exist than between carnivorous plants and animals. However, few studies have considered inter-Kingdom competition among carnivorous plants and animals. 2. In order to evaluate interactions between a carnivorous plant (greater bladderwort, EUtricularia vulgaris) and a vertebrate (bluegill%, Lepomis macrochirus) on a shared prey (zooplankton), we conducted a mesocosm experiment. We deployed two levels of bladderwort presence (functional and crushed) and measured bluegill responses (survival and growth). 3. Zooplankton abundance was reduced the greatest in bluegill and functional bladderworts treatments. Bluegill survival did not differ among treatments, but growth was greatest with crushed bladderwort. Thus bluegill growth was facilitated by reducing interference competition in the presence of crushed bladderwort. The facilitating effect was dampened, however, when functional bladderwort removed a shared prey. 4.To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to experimentally demonstrate interactions between a carnivorous plant and a fish. Our data suggests that carnivorous plants may actively promote or reduce animal co-occurrence from some ecosystems via facilitation or competition.

Usage Notes

Location

eastern North America