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Data from: Anthropogenic noise, but not artificial light levels predicts song behaviour in an equatorial bird

Citation

Dorado-Correa, Adriana M.; Rodriguez-Rocha, Manuel; Brumm, Henrik (2016), Data from: Anthropogenic noise, but not artificial light levels predicts song behaviour in an equatorial bird, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.j23g3

Abstract

Birds in cities start singing earlier in the morning than in rural areas; commonly this shift is attributed to light pollution. Some studies have suggested that traffic noise has a stronger influence on singing activity than artificial light does. Changes in the timing of singing behaviour in relation to noise and light pollution have only been investigated in the temperate zones. Tropical birds, however, experience little seasonal variation in day length and may be less dependent on light intensity as a modifier for reproductive behaviours such as song. To test whether noise or light pollution has a stronger impact on the dawn chorus of a tropical bird, we investigated the singing behaviour of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) in Bogota, Colombia at two times during the year. We found that birds in places with high noise levels started to sing earlier. Light pollution did not have a significant effect. Birds may begin to sing earlier in noisy areas to avoid acoustic masking by traffic later in the morning. Our results also suggest that some tropical birds may be less sensitive to variations in day length and thus less sensitive to light pollution.

Usage Notes

Location

Colombia
Cundinamarca
Susa
Bogota