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Data from: Landscape models for nuclear genetic diversity and genetic structure in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus)

Citation

Taylor, Zachary S.; Hoffman, Susan M. G. (2013), Data from: Landscape models for nuclear genetic diversity and genetic structure in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.j272c

Abstract

Dramatic changes in the North American landscape over the last 12 000 years have shaped the genomes of the small mammals, such as the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), which currently inhabit the region. However, very recent interactions of populations with each other and the environment are expected to leave the most pronounced signature on rapidly evolving nuclear microsatellite loci. We analyzed landscape characteristics and microsatellite markers of P. leucopus populations along a transect from southern Ohio to northern Michigan, in order to evaluate hypotheses about the spatial distribution of genetic heterogeneity. Genetic diversity increased to the north and was best approximated by a single-variable model based on habitat availability within a 0.5-km radius of trapping sites. Interpopulation differentiation measured by clustering analysis was highly variable and not significantly related to latitude or habitat availability. Interpopulation differentiation measured as FST values and chord distance was correlated with the proportion of habitat intervening, but was best explained by agricultural distance and by latitude. The observed gradients in diversity and interpopulation differentiation were consistent with recent habitat availability being the major constraint on effective population size in this system, and contradicted the predictions of both the postglacial expansion and core-periphery hypotheses.

Usage Notes

Location

Ohio
Michigan
Great Lakes